vintageruminance:

Sigourney Weaver looking to camera between takes on Aliens in 1985, London

comicbookoverkill:

waltorr:

Probably the most perfect casting of a pre-existing character ever.

JK Simmons really got into the meat of the character of J Jonah Jameson

52nddoor:

Cleaned up and colored some sketches I did while at HeroesCon.

Hawkeye is a book I consistently love. It’s one of my favorites every month.

Iron Fist is one I’m new to. Comixology had a sale on The Immortal Iron Fist a while back and I read it and loved it (he punches a train and it explodes!!!). Not surprising, since it’s the same creative team for the most part as Hawkeye (Matt Fraction and David Aja). 

deadshirt:

Wednesday, June 25th, marks the 30th anniversary of the release of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain. In honor of this, Deadshirt presents an entire week of art and essays that explore and celebrate one of the greatest albums of all time.

Sonically, “The Beautiful Ones” paints a lush, cinematic portrait of a man conflicted. The foreboding burble of the song’s opening synth dirge lurches, temporarily replicating the butterfly tummy nausea of Making A Stand. How doomed and full of regret these Beautiful Ones must be?”

Dominic Griffin (captainfuck​), 30 Purple Years: 3. The Beautiful Ones

mixstation:

deadshirt:

Art by Jen Overstreet (mixstation)
Wednesday, June 25th, marks the 30th anniversary of the release of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain. In honor of this, Deadshirt presents an entire week of art and essays that explore and celebrate one of the greatest albums of all time.
"Nestled deep into the first side of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain, “Computer Blue” serves its purpose in the film as a musical rough patch between The Kid and his muse, Apollonia. But in the greater context of Prince’s career as a professional solo musician, it’s perhaps the first great signifier of the often uneasy, frighteningly accurate ways Prince turns audiences on its head with frequent use (and abuse) of technology.”
Mike Duquette, 30 Purple Years: 4. Computer Blue

WENDY
IS THE WATER WARM ENOUGH

mixstation:

deadshirt:

Art by Jen Overstreet (mixstation)

Wednesday, June 25th, marks the 30th anniversary of the release of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain. In honor of this, Deadshirt presents an entire week of art and essays that explore and celebrate one of the greatest albums of all time.

"Nestled deep into the first side of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain, “Computer Blue” serves its purpose in the film as a musical rough patch between The Kid and his muse, Apollonia. But in the greater context of Prince’s career as a professional solo musician, it’s perhaps the first great signifier of the often uneasy, frighteningly accurate ways Prince turns audiences on its head with frequent use (and abuse) of technology.”

Mike Duquette, 30 Purple Years: 4. Computer Blue

WENDY

IS THE WATER WARM ENOUGH

deadshirt:

Wednesday, June 25th, marks the 30th anniversary of the release of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain. In honor of this, Deadshirt presents an entire week of art and essays that explore and celebrate one of the greatest albums of all time.

A gender-fucking little man who could shred and craft Art&B and be kind of reclusive and play all kinds of “real” instruments and also make a wonderfully terrible Hollywood musical does not compute. Better to acknowledge it and then keep it moving. We’ve got a conventionally macho, dickhead white man guitar G-d canon to uphold, now don’t we?

Prince is one of the most recognizable pop stars ever, and somehow, he’s still underrated. How’d that happen?”

Brandon Soderberg, 30 Purple Years: 2. Take Me With U

deadshirt:

Art by jojoseames
Wednesday, June 25th, marks the 30th anniversary of the release of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain. In honor of this, Deadshirt presents an entire week of art and essays that explore and celebrate one of the greatest albums of all time.
"The spiritual successor to Funkadelic’s acid-trippy "Free Your Mind…and Your Ass Will Follow," "Let’s Go Crazy" is the track that opens Purple Rain and is the very first bit of music featured in the film of the same name. The decision to start off the album and its accompanying movie with this song is a no-brainer; it’s a song calculated to get your blood pumping and loosen up those party muscles. “Let’s go crazy. Let’s get nuts.” These aren’t so much invitations from Prince as commands.”—Max Robinsion (hiveofscumblr), 30 Purple Years: 1. Let’s Go Crazy

deadshirt:

Art by jojoseames

Wednesday, June 25th, marks the 30th anniversary of the release of Prince and The Revolution’s Purple Rain. In honor of this, Deadshirt presents an entire week of art and essays that explore and celebrate one of the greatest albums of all time.

"The spiritual successor to Funkadelic’s acid-trippy "Free Your Mind…and Your Ass Will Follow," "Let’s Go Crazy" is the track that opens Purple Rain and is the very first bit of music featured in the film of the same name. The decision to start off the album and its accompanying movie with this song is a no-brainer; it’s a song calculated to get your blood pumping and loosen up those party muscles. “Let’s go crazy. Let’s get nuts.” These aren’t so much invitations from Prince as commands.”
—Max Robinsion (hiveofscumblr), 30 Purple Years: 1. Let’s Go Crazy

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